Graphic

Architecture

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Year

2017

1. Helvetica Poster

2. Interior Elevations: A-Typical House

Young architects are defined by graphics. They do not have enough opportunities to build, therefore they make images. Drawings, renderings, photographs, and films are ways they construct images. Even more so now in the 21st century.

This is a very good thing.

 

Architects don’t make buildings. Instead, we construct drawings of buildings.  We are construction document makers along with other subjects. Yet so few of us get the opportunity to see our drawings translated into buildings. Instead, we invent and organize information about buildings on paper. The knowledge that we accrue through conversations, seeing, and doing only influences our recursivity.

 

More is more. More autonomy, more marketability, more meaning, more freedom, more confusion, more more. 1

 

Just as the graphic designer exhausts combinations of the alphabet into words and symbols, the architect re-uses forms and ideas more and more and more. But graphic architecture helps restrict the more into a limited edition; a one of a kind. Celebrate the image, the most powerful thing any architect can make.

 

In graphic architecture then, it is quite impossible to consider the building as one thing. We should consider its graphic representation as a body of work that represents the difficult whole 2 and its life (come full circle) after its existence as a photograph or an image. The existence of any building with a critical idea relies more on its process than the neighborhood it supports. Architecture’s ultimate aim is a building made up of limited editions: drawings, objects, writings, books, posters, films, stories. We must invest in the graphic! We must have a variety of work!

 

I made two posters that might be of interest.

 

Graphic design helps organize information to aid in navigating through the complexity and intricacy of today’s drawings. Construction document sets are filled with so many parts, it becomes challenging to organize information. If you are interested in the way connections between things allow communication and understanding of architectural work, the way one reads a construction document set by navigating between drawings to eventually grasp the whole, how this relates to linguistic works and how graphic design is structured, where things need to be decoded, read from left to right, top to bottom, right to left, then these images might be of interest to you.

 

1. Helvetica Poster

2. Interior Elevations: A-Typical House

 

The Helvetica poster is doing something similar to the drawing of interior elevations. First, understand their formal similarities. They are both aligned to the left. Twenty-six letters on one and almost twenty-eight elevations on the other. The spacing between text and elevations are consistent. One poster is minimal, the other is filled with multitudinous lines and figures. A more important fact about these images is their relationship to a construction document set. The interior elevations show seven interior rooms unfolded. The drawings represent information on other pages within a construction document set. Simultaneously, these elevations provide clues to other elevations, which help our understanding of the represented rooms’ interiority. The Helvetica poster is effectually very similar, while strongly positioning itself as graphic design. The alphabet is shown in an orderly grid. The letters A-C-E-H-I-L-T-V are red, forcing the viewer to navigate between them to spell out H-E-L-V-E-T-I-C-A. So, just like a construction document asks us to navigate through an organized set of information, graphic design asks architects to understand their work through operatively navigating their ideas—formally.  on one idea, one number, one precedent, one person, one sentence. Send me a text when you’re done.'

Are we starting to connect the dots?

 

Architect Mark Wigley connects the dots.

 

Those of you who feel that graphics are a lesser art, an art of seduction, and that architecture is a superior art that doesn’t seduce but quietly exudes its own virtue—be careful. Can you image architecture without graphic design? It’s almost impossible. Can you even imagine the world itself—Architecture—without some kind of image? 2

 

 

Graphic Designer Michael Rock connects the dots.

 

Architecture is born and dies as graphic design. Think of the work you do in architecture school: how much of it is printed, written, illustrated, diagrammed, photoshopped, collaged, animated, and ultimately presented. All graphic. Think of the buildings you know: how many of them are from books, magazines, catalogs, websites, blogs, collages, photographs, and, ultimately, drawings. Again, all graphic. You design, and you know, things primarily through their graphic representation. 3

 

Architect Michael Meredith connects the dots.

 

Today we must claim a space for architectural discourse that is neither a metanarrative of a project nor the atomization of architecture into buildings but the idea of a collection, an oeuvre, a body of work. As a way to construct relationships between buildings, objects, drawings, and other innumerable fragments of architectural practice and to incorporate them into a difficult whole*, the body of work exceeds individual buildings and the contingencies of practice. It returns agency to the architect, without a prior project; it also shifts away from the contingent instantiations of buildings -- that is, the images circulated by social media -- and toward something more protracted, something that emerges and changes over time.4

 

 

Invest in the graphic. More drawings, more films, more writing, more books, more images, more ideas, more, more, more. You are a young architect and you should master your medium. You should embrace the stereotype.

 

 

Works Cited

 

 

1. Yale School of Art. “More.” More. N.p., n.d. Web. 01 Nov. 2016.

 

2. Mark Wigley. “An Introduction,” in Multiple Signatures: On Designers, Authors, Readers and Users, Michael Rock, 2x4, eds. (New York: Rizzoli, 2013), 17-18 (17).

 

3. Michael Rock. “2 × 4: Home,” Architecture in Print: New Approaches to Graphic Design (2016): n. pag. 2 × 4: Home. 29 Jan. 2016. Web. 01 Nov. 2016.

 

4.  Michael Meredith. “Toward the Body of Work,” Log 35. (Fall 2015): xx-xx (13-14).

 

 

 

© 2017

Young architects are defined by graphics. They do not have enough opportunities to build, therefore they make images. Drawings, renderings, photographs, and films are ways they construct images. Even more so now in the 21st century!

This is a very good thing.

 

Architects don’t make buildings. Instead, we construct drawings of buildings.  We are construction document makers along with other subjects. Yet so few of us get the opportunity to see our drawings translated into buildings. Instead, we invent and organize information about buildings on paper. The knowledge that we accrue through conversations, seeing, and doing only influences our recursivity.

 

More is more! More autonomy, more marketability, more meaning, more freedom, more confusion, more more! 1

 

Just as the graphic designer exhausts combinations of the alphabet into words and symbols, the architect re-uses forms and ideas more and more and more. But graphic architecture helps restrict the more into a limited edition; a one of a kind. Celebrate the image, the most powerful thing any architect can make.

 

In graphic architecture then, it is quite impossible to consider the building as one thing. We should consider its graphic representation as a body of work that represents the difficult whole 2 and its life (come full circle) after its existence as a photograph or an image. The existence of any building with a critical idea relies more on its process than the neighborhood it supports. Architecture’s ultimate aim is a building made up of limited editions: drawings, objects, writings, books, posters, films, stories. We must invest in the graphic! We must have a variety of work!

 

I made two posters that might be of interest.

 

Graphic design helps organize information to aid in navigating through the complexity and intricacy of today’s drawings. Construction document sets are filled with so many parts, it becomes challenging to organize information. If you are interested in the way connections between things allow communication and understanding of architectural work, the way one reads a construction document set by navigating between drawings to eventually grasp the whole, how this relates to linguistic works and how graphic design is structured, where things need to be decoded, read from left to right, top to bottom, right to left, then these images might be of interest to you.

 

1. Helvetica Poster

2. Interior Elevations: A-Typical House

 

The Helvetica poster is doing something similar to the drawing of interior elevations. First, understand their formal similarities. They are both aligned to the left. Twenty-six letters on one and almost twenty-eight elevations on the other. The spacing between text and elevations are consistent. One poster is minimal, the other is filled with multitudinous lines and figures. A more important fact about these images is their relationship to a construction document set. The interior elevations show seven interior rooms unfolded. The drawings represent information on other pages within a construction document set. Simultaneously, these elevations provide clues to other elevations, which help our understanding of the represented rooms’ interiority. The Helvetica poster is effectually very similar, while strongly positioning itself as graphic design. The alphabet is shown in an orderly grid. The letters A-C-E-H-I-L-T-V are red, forcing the viewer to navigate between them to spell out H-E-L-V-E-T-I-C-A. So, just like a construction document asks us to navigate through an organized set of information, graphic design asks architects to understand their work through operatively navigating their ideas—formally.  on one idea, one number, one precedent, one person, one sentence. Send me a text when you’re done.'

 

Are we starting to connect the dots?

 

Architect Mark Wigley connects the dots.

 

Those of you who feel that graphics are a lesser art, an art of seduction, and that architecture is a superior art that doesn’t seduce but quietly exudes its own virtue—be careful. Can you image architecture without graphic design? It’s almost impossible. Can you even imagine the world itself—Architecture—without some kind of image? 2

 

 

Graphic Designer Michael Rock connects the dots.

 

Architecture is born and dies as graphic design. Think of the work you do in architecture school: how much of it is printed, written, illustrated, diagrammed, photoshopped, collaged, animated, and ultimately presented. All graphic. Think of the buildings you know: how many of them are from books, magazines, catalogs, websites, blogs, collages, photographs, and, ultimately, drawings. Again, all graphic. You design, and you know, things primarily through their graphic representation. 3

 

Architect Michael Meredith connects the dots.

 

Today we must claim a space for architectural discourse that is neither a metanarrative of a project nor the atomization of architecture into buildings but the idea of a collection, an oeuvre, a body of work. As a way to construct relationships between buildings, objects, drawings, and other innumerable fragments of architectural practice and to incorporate them into a difficult whole*, the body of work exceeds individual buildings and the contingencies of practice. It returns agency to the architect, without a prior project; it also shifts away from the contingent instantiations of buildings -- that is, the images circulated by social media -- and toward something more protracted, something that emerges and changes over time.4

 

 

Invest in the graphic. More drawings, more films, more writing, more books, more images, more ideas, more, more, more. You are a young architect and you should master your medium. You should embrace the stereotype.

 

 

 

Works Cited

 

 

1. Yale School of Art. “More.” More. N.p., n.d. Web. 01 Nov. 2016.

 

2. Mark Wigley. “An Introduction,” in Multiple Signatures: On Designers, Authors, Readers and Users, Michael Rock, 2x4, eds. (New York: Rizzoli, 2013), 17-18 (17).

 

3. Michael Rock. “2 × 4: Home,” Architecture in Print: New Approaches to Graphic Design (2016): n. pag. 2 × 4: Home. 29 Jan. 2016. Web. 01 Nov. 2016.

 

4.  Michael Meredith. “Toward the Body of Work,” Log 35. (Fall 2015): xx-xx (13-14).